Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted Ransomware Removal Guide

Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware is distributed by the Trojan horse Harasom. The program does not have an official name. Security experts have named it after a phrase it uses. A couple of encryption viruses are spread by Harasom. The other was given the name Spamhaus ransomware because it misrepresents the Spamhaus Project. Both infections belong to the category of police ransomware. Encryption viruses of this type pose as federal agents. They display a message on the user’s desktop, stating he has been convicted of a crime. Most win-lockers do not state the offense for certain. They blame people of cyber crimes, listing a few possible violations. This is the case with Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware. The win-locker misrepresents the United States Department of Justice. It tells the user his computer has been blocked due to being used for criminal activities. The message informs the person that all illegal activities on his computer have been recorded and stored in the police database. It is said that your webcam was used to identify you. The statement says you have to pay a release fee of $100 USD to avoid a potential sentence of 5 years in prison and a $250,000 USD fine. There is no merit to these claims. This is all a ploy, devised by the cyber criminals behind Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware.

Since Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware is spread by a Trojan horse, protecting your machine requires knowledge on the distribution techniques of Harasom. The Trojan is usually spread through spam e-mails. This method allows the execution of macros and Javascript. The malignant program would hide behind an attachment from the e-mail. Opening the file would result in it being downloaded and installed. Spammers are quite crafty at making bogus e-mails look legitimate. The fake message of Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware is an example of how hackers can copy the contacts and logo of an existing institution. A bogus e-mail can be sent on behalf of the national post, a courier firm, a bank, a government branch and other organizations. To get your attention, the message will talk about an urgent matter. It can tell you there is a delivery package for you, ask you to settle a payment or provide certain documentation to a government institution. The notification will point to the attached file for further details. To check if an e-mail is reliable, you have to proof the sender’s data. His e-mail account should match the address of the entity he is representing.

Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted Ransomware
Download Removal Tool for Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted Ransomware

As the notification states, Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware encrypts all your personal files. The win-locker can render the following common file types inaccessible: .js, .ai, .html, .zip, .rar, .odt, .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt, .pptx, .asp, .aspx, .txt, .pdf, .qic, .arw, .cer, .rtf, .wps, .lnk, .pak, .csv, .sql, .jpg, .jpeg, .gif, .png, .bmp, .psd, .tif, .tiff, .dng, .m3u, .m4a, .sys, .reg, .dll, .vb, .iff, .ini, .bin, .avi, .mkv, .mp4, .wmv, .mov, .mpg, .mpeg, .flv, .dat, .bdf, .raw, .cdr, .qic, .srf, .lnk, .pfx, .ogg, .mp3, .flac, .wav, .wma, .mid, .crw, .sln, .exe, .bat, .sct, .eps, .bkp, .mdb, .db, .exif, .wsc, .xml, .ps1 and others. Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware lists three possible reasons for taking actions against you. This includes possessing pirated software, distributing pornography and spreading malware. It is noted that the latter may be happening without your knowledge or consent. In this instance, you would be charged with neglectful use of your personal computer. Telling people they may not have knowledge of their PC being misused is a clever strategy. For the other two offenses, the person would know whether or not he is guilty. The release fee for the misconduct is $100 USD. It can be paid through the MoneyPak, Vanilla Reload or Reloadit platforms. The developers of Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware have not determined the amount of the release fee well. It is rather low for the offenses described. If you found the message suspicious, you were right.

You can uninstall Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted ransomware with an antivirus program. There is a removal guide below. If you have a backup, you will be able to recover your files. A free tool called Shadow Explorer can help you with the restoration: shadowexplorer.com/downloads.

Everything on your computer has been fully encrypted Ransomware Removal Instructions

Windows Vista and Windows 7

1. Reboot your PC computer and press F8.
2. Navigate to Windows Advanced Options and select Safe Mode with Networking, pressing Enter.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search box of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on your PC.
5. Scan your system with the antimalware tool and remove any infected files and viruses.

Windows 8

1. Open the Start menu and press the Windows key.
2. Open the web browser.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search box of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on your PC.
5. Scan your system with the antimalware program and delete all infected files and viruses.

Windows XP

1. Reboot your PC and press F8.
2. Navigate to Windows Advanced Options and select Safe Mode with Networking, pressing Enter.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search box of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on your PC.
5. Scan your system with the antimalware tool and erase any infected files and viruses.
6. Go to the Start Menu and press Run.
7. Type “msconfig” in the search bar and click OK.
8. In the System Configuration Utility go to the “Startup” tab and select the option “Disable All”.
9. Press OK and reboot your PC.

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