Protected Ransomware Removal Guide

Protected ransomware is a win-locker which imitates CryptoWall 3.0. The virus drops a ransom note, stating that your files have been encrypted by CryptoWall 3.0. However, Protected ransomware is not an actual variant of the win-locker it claims to be. It has been modeled after it, borrowing a lot of the technical specifications and coding algorithms. Protected ransomware targets documents, compressed folders, archives, databases, images, audio, video and other files. To sum up the penetration capability of the insidious program, we will give you a brief list of the vulnerable file types: .doc, .docx, .txt, .pdf, .html, .sql, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt, .pptx, .wps, .raw, .pak, .mdb, .db, .wsc, .crw, .reg, .eps, .ps1, .m3u, .m4a, .ai, .ps1, .sys, .lnk, .avi, .wmv, .mov, .mpg, .mpeg, .mkv, .flv, .ogg, .dat, .dng, .iff, .bin, .srf, .vb, .png, .bmp, .jpg, .jpeg, .gif, .tif, .tiff, .psd, .exif, .csv, .qic, .ini, .js, .bat, .sln, .mp3, .wav, .wma, .flac, .mid, .exe. The win-locker appends the .protected extension to each encrypted file. Protected ransomware asks victims to pay a fee within 7 days. The people behind the nefarious program posses a decryption key. If you do not pay them timely, they will destroy it. A replacement key cannot be generated. This is a trivial scare tactic. You should not allow cyber criminals to manipulate your better judgment.

Protected ransomware can be distributed in a couple of ways. The most common method is traveling in spam e-mails. The furtive program can be transferred through a malicious macros. Opening a corrupted attachment can infect your machine on the spot. Spam letters could appear genuine. The person behind the message can misrepresent a reliable entity, such as the national post, a courier firm, an institution, a bank, a shopping platform, a social network or the police department. The letter might contain the logo of the organization and list its official contacts. To check if the message is legitimate, you can look up the e-mail address or contact the entity in question. Protected ransomware can also be spread through another program. The win-locker can merged its setup file with the executable of another program, like a freeware tool or a pirated application. Protected ransomware does not run its own wizard or open a dialog box. The insidious program will be included in the terms and conditions of the download client as an optional tool and listed under a fake name to throw you off. In such cases, the default option is to have the extra tool installed. If you skip through the steps in haste, you may not even realize you have allowed an undesired program into your machine.

Protected Ransomware
Download Removal Tool for Protected Ransomware

Protected ransomware uses a combination of two encryption technologies to lock files – RSA-2048 and AES CBC-256. This particular combination of ciphers is used by win-lockers quite often. The hackers store the private key, required for the decryption, on a command and control (C&C) server. Protected ransomware drops a ransom note titled HOW_TO_RESTORE_YOUR_DATA.html. The file contains instructions on how to pay the ransom. The hackers have chosen bitcoins as a payment method because transactions in this cryptocurrency assure anonymity for the recipient. Protected ransomware asks for 0.5 bitcoins. This amounts to about $349.25 USD. The exchange rates change daily, so the sum could be different at the time you contact the virus. In the ransom note, it is stated that the amount is roughly $200 USD. This hints that Protected ransomware has been around for a while. The virus tries to scare people and convince them that the only way out is to pay the ransom. The rogue program gives users 7 days to pay. It is elaborated that removing Protected ransomware on your own would not result in your files being decrypted. This action will, however, lead to the decryption key being destroyed. Contrary to the win-locker’s claims, meeting the demands is not a wise move. Even if your accessibility does get restored momentarily, the virus could leave backup data on your hard drive and eventually strike again.

The best course of action is to start by uninstalling Protected ransomware with a professional antivirus program. There is a guide below which explains how to proceed with a scan. If you have a backup, you can try to restore your files pursuant to deleting the win-locker. A tool called Shadow Explorer can help you with the recovery. It can be downloaded from the following page: shadowexplorer.com/downloads.

Protected Ransomware Removal Instructions

Windows XP

1. Reboot your PC and press the F8 key.
2. Go to Windows Advanced Options and select Safe Mode with Networking, press Enter.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search bar of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on the computer.
5. Scan the system with the antimalware tool and erase any infected files and viruses.
6. Go to the Start Menu and then click Run.
7. Type “msconfig” in the search bar and click OK.
8. In the System Configuration Utility go to the “Startup” tab and select the option “Disable All”.
9. Press OK and reboot the PC.

Windows Vista and Windows 7

1. Reboot your PC computer and press the F8 key.
2. Go to Windows Advanced Options and select Safe Mode with Networking, press Enter.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search bar of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on your computer.
5. Scan the system with the antimalware program and erase any infected files and viruses.

Windows 8

1. Go to the Start menu and click on the Windows key.
2. Open the web browser.
3. Type: http://www.xp-vista.com/download-instructions in the search bar of your web browser.
4. Download SpyHunter and install it on your computer.
5. Scan the system with the antimalware tool and erase any infected files and viruses.

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